Presented below is our summary of significant IRS guidance and relevant tax matters for the week of August 6 – 10, 2018:

August 6, 2018: The IRS and Treasury issued final regulations, which provide guidance regarding the new partnership audit rules. The regulations describe the procedure for designating a partnership representative and the partnership representative’s authority. They also address the time, form and manner of an election to apply the new audit regime to prior partnership tax years.

August 6, 2018: The IRS published Revenue Procedure 2018-40, which describes procedures for small businesses to obtain automatic consent for changing an accounting method to a new method established under the TCJA (P.L. 115-97).

August 7, 2018: The IRS published an updated subject matter directory, available here.

August 8, 2018: The IRS published proposed regulations under new section 199A, which provides a 20 percent deduction for qualifying income earned by certain non-corporate taxpayers during tax years beginning after December 31, 2018. The proposed regulations address which taxpayers are eligible for the deduction and provide guidance regarding the computation of the deduction.

August 8, 2018: The IRS released Notice 2018-64, which includes a proposed revenue procedure that would provide guidance regarding calculating W-2 wages for purposes of the section 199A deduction.

August 10, 2018: The IRS released their weekly list of written determinations (e.g., Private Letter Rulings, Technical Advice Memorandum and Chief Counsel Advice).

Special thanks to Kevin Hall in our DC office for this week’s roundup.

Presented below is our weekly roundup for July 9 – 13, 2018 on significant IRS matters.

July 9, 2018: The IRS released Internal Revenue Bulletin No. 2018-28 including: Notice 2018-48 (lists the population census tracts designated as qualified opportunity zones); Notice 2018-59 (provides two methods for taxpayers to begin construction for the investment tax credit under Section 48); Announcement 2018-11 (Office of Professional Responsibility [OPR] announces recent disciplinary sanctions); Rev. Rul. 2018-20 (rendering obsolete several previous revenue rulings); and Rev. Proc. 2018-35 (modifying Rev. Proc. 2018-31 regarding accounting methods for citrus plant replanting costs).

July 11, 2018: The IRS issued final regulations (T.D. 9834) addressing inversion transactions structured to avoid the purposes of sections 7874 and 367 and other post-inversion tax avoidance transactions.

July 13, 2018: The IRS issued proposed regulations (REG-103474-18) related to the Code section 6695(g) return preparer penalty amending previous guidance to reflect changes made by 2017 federal tax reform.

July 13, 2018: The IRS released it weekly list of written determination (e.g., Private Letter Rulings, Technical Advice Memorandum and Chief Counsel Advice).

Special thanks to Christy Vouri-Misso and Greg Berson in our DC office for this week’s roundup.

Presented below is our weekly roundup for July 2-6, 2018 on significant IRS matters.

June 29, 2018: The IRS announced in IR-2018-146 that they plan to streamline the Form 1040 to shorten and simplify it for the 2019 tax filing season. The new approach would allow all taxpayers to use the same form. Draft of new Form 1040.

July 2, 2018: The IRS released Internal Revenue Bulletin No. 2018-27 including: Notice 2018-56 (updating the corporate bond monthly yield curve); Rev. Rul. 2018-19 (providing the various prescribed rates for federal income tax purposes for July 2018); and REG-106977-18 (proposing amendment to the definition of investment-type property for purposes of tax-advantaged bonds and the arbitrage investment yield restrictions under § 148 that apply to those bonds).

July 2, 2018: The IRS has announced the identification and selection of five Large Business and International compliance campaigns. These are 1) Restoration of Sequestered AMT Credit Carryforward; 2) S Corporation Distributions; 3) Virtual Currency; 4) Repatriation via Foreign Triangular Reorganizations; and 5) Section 965 Transition Tax.

July 6, 2018: The IRS released it weekly list of written determination (e.g., Private Letter Rulings, Technical Advice Memorandum, and Chief Counsel Advice).

Special thanks to Christy Vouri-Misso and Greg Berson in our DC office for this week’s round-up.

The first New York meeting of McDermott’s Tax in the City® initiative in 2018 coincided with the June 21 issuance of the US Supreme Court’s (SCOTUS) highly anticipated Wayfair decision. Just before our meeting, SCOTUS issued its opinion determining that remote sellers that do not have a physical presence in a state can be required to collect sales tax on sales to customers in that state. McDermott SALT partner Diann Smith relayed the decision and its impact on online retailers to a captivated audience. Click here to read McDermott’s insight about the decision.

The event also featured a CLE/CPE presentation on the ethical considerations relative to tax reform by Kristen Hazel, Jane May and Maureen O’Brien, followed by a roundtable discussion on recent tax reform insights led by Britt Haxton, Sandra McGill, Kathleen Quinn and Diann Smith. Below are a few takeaways from last week’s Tax in the City® New York:

  • Supreme Court Update: Wayfair – Jurisdiction to Tax – The 5-4 opinion concluded that the physical presence requirement established by the Court in its 1967 National Bellas Hess decision and reaffirmed in 1992’s Quill is “unsound and incorrect” and that “stare decisis can no longer support the Court’s prohibition of a valid exercise of the States’ sovereign power.” This opinion will have an immediate and significant impact on sales and use tax collection obligations across the country and is something every company and state must immediately and carefully evaluate within the context of existing state and local collection authority. Click here to read McDermott’s insight about the decision.
  • Tax Reform: Ethical Considerations – Because of tax reform, taxpayers face increased uncertainty and will likely face increased IRS/state scrutiny for their 2017 and 2018 returns. Therefore, it’s crucial for taxpayers to be intentional about post-reform planning and compliance by coordinating among various departments (federal tax, state and local tax, employee benefits, treasury, operations, etc.). Taxpayers should understand the weight of various IRS and state revenue authority guidance, the IRS’s authority to issue retroactive regulations within 18 months of passing legislation, and how to take reasonable positions in the absence of guidance. They should also understand that the IRS is allowed more than three years to assess tax, even when there is an omission of global intangible low taxed income (GILTI) or when the tax relates to the Section 965 transition tax.
  • Tax Reform Changes to Employee Compensation and Benefit Deductions – Post-tax reform, all employees of US public companies, private companies with US publicly traded debt, and foreign issuers with ADRs traded on the US market are covered employees subject to the $1 million limit for deductible compensation. Though a grandfather rule applies if existing contracts are not materially modified, key questions about how to apply this rule remain. Tax reform eliminated the employer deduction for transportation subsidies (other than bicycle subsidies). It also reduced employers’ ability to deduct meal and entertainment expenses, and removed employers’ and employees’ ability to deduct moving expenses.
  • False Claims Act and Starbucks – False Claims Act actions involving state tax issues are becoming more and more prevalent. These actions are concerning because state laws often provide for treble damages and/or per occurrence penalties. Read more about McDermott’s win in the Starbucks case here.
  • GILTI’s Effect on State and Local Tax – There is much to-do about GILTI at the state level. Be sure to monitor state legislation and administrative guidance concerning the inclusion of GILTI in the state tax base in the states that are important to your business. The state-level guidance is evolving every day.

We invite all tax professionals who identify as female to continue the conversation and share tax developments with the official LinkedIn group for Tax in the City®! Click here to join.

The next Tax in the City® meetings will take place in the Fall of 2018, in Chicago, New York, Seattle and our inaugural event in Dallas. Please contact Mia Dubinets if you would like to be added to any of the regional Tax in the City® mailing lists, and register for the upcoming events.

Here’s what happened in the world of IRS guidance for the week June 11 – 15, 2018.

June 11, 2018: The IRS issued Notice 2018-55 describing potential proposed regulations that would offer relief to some private colleges and universities by providing a stepped-up basis rule that could reduce the amount of gain subject to a new 1.4 percent excise tax on their endowments.

June 12, 2018: The IRS issued proposed regulations, under Code section 148 applicable to tax-exempt and other tax-advantaged bonds, aimed to restrict arbitrage investments and providing an exception to the definition of investment-type property for capital projects that further the public purpose for which the bonds were issued.

June 12, 2018: Pursuant to its continuing effort to reduce paperwork, the IRS requested comments on a number of published guidance, including: Rev. Proc. 2003-33 (extension of time to file a section 338 election to treat stock purchases as asset acquisitions); TD 8379 and TD 9407 (regulations regarding the manner and method of reporting and paying the excise tax on the receipt of greenmail); TD 8791 (relating to charitable remainder trusts and to special valuation rules for transfers of interests in trusts); and, TD 8571 (relating to the reporting of certain information relating to payments of mortgage interest). All comments are due by August 13, 2018.

June 15, 2018: The IRS announced the corporate bond monthly yield curve, the 24-month average segments rats, the 30-year Treasury securities interest rate, the 30-year Treasury weighted average rate, and the minimum present-value segment rates in Notice 2018-56.

June 15, 2018: The IRS released its weekly list of written determinations (e.g., Private Letter Rulings, Technical Advice Memorandum and Chief Counsel Advice).

Special thanks to Christy Vouri and Greg Berson in our DC office for this week’s round-up.

In order to continue to keep our readers informed on tax matters, we will be rolling out weekly posts on significant Internal Revenue Service (IRS) guidance and relevant tax cases. This post marks our first round-up of IRS guidance for the week June 4 – 8, 2018.

June 4, 2018: The IRS issued 3 new FAQs (supplementing the original 14 tax reform FAQs) which announce that it will waive certain late-payment penalties relating to the section 965 transition tax.

June 4, 2018: The IRS issued Internal Revenue Bulletin No. 2018-23 including: Rev. Proc. 2018-32 (combining guidance for grantors and contributors to tax-exempt organizations); Rev. Proc. 2018-34 (providing indexing adjustments for certain provisions under section 36B); Rev. Rul. 2018-14 (obsoleting Rev. Rul. 68-59, 1968-1 C.B. 273); Rev. Rul 2018-15 (obsoleting Rev. Rul. 74-487, 1974-2 C.B. 82; Rev. Rul. 75-211, 1975-1 C.B. 86; Rev. Rul. 77-115, 1977-1 C.B. 154; Rev. Rul. 77-407, 1977-2 C.B. 77; and, Rev. Rul. 80-11, 1980-1 C.B. 58); and Rev. Rul. 2018-16 (providing the prescribed federal interest rates for June 2018).

June 7, 2018: The IRS issued an early release draft of Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate seeking comments from industry.

June 7, 2018: With hurricane season underway, the IRS warns taxpayers that scammers often try to take advantage of the generosity of taxpayers who want to help victims of major disasters.

June 8, 2018: The IRS issued final regulations under sections 337 and 732 that: (1) prevent a corporate partner from avoiding corporate-level gain through transactions with a partnership involving equity interests of the partner or certain related entities, (2) allow consolidated group members that are partners in the same partnership to aggregate their bases in stock for certain purposes and (3) that may require certain corporations that engage in gain elimination transactions to reduce the basis of corporate assets or to recognize gain.

June 8, 2018: The IRS released its weekly list of written determinations (e.g., Private Letter Rulings, Technical Advice Memorandum and Chief Counsel Advice).

Special thanks to Christy Vouri-Misso in our DC office for this week’s round-up.

Wrapping Up April – and Looking Forward to May

Top April Posts You May Have Missed

President Trump Announces Intent to Nominate Emin Toro to Tax Court

IRS Releases Practice Unit on Statutes of Limitation

National Taxpayer Advocate Reminds Congress of IRS Deficiencies

Tax Controversy Activities This Week

May 1, 2018: Elizabeth Erickson is on “Exchange of Information – The New Landscape” at the TEI Audits and Appeals Seminar in New Orleans, LA.

May 3, 2018: Andrew Roberson is presenting “Preventing Disputes 2: Taxpayer Rights in the Administrative Phase” at the International Conference on Taxpayer Rights in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Upcoming Tax Controversy Activities in May

Our lawyers will present on the following key tax topics during the month of May. We hope to see you.

May 7, 2018: Kristen Hazel and Michael Louis will present “Navigating Tax Reform: BEAT and FDII” at TEI-Houston Chapter 2018 Tax School in Houston, TX.

May 10, 2018: Robin Greenhouse and Kevin Spencer are going to speak about tax controversy and privilege at the International Fiscal Association’s New York/Connecticut Region meeting in Old Greenwich, CT.

May 11, 2018: Elizabeth Erickson will discuss “Section 162(q) – No Longer Silent” at the ABA Section of Taxation Meeting in Washington, DC.

May 11, 2018:  Stephen Kranz will present “Handling Tax Controversy to Win” and “The Digital Tax Tsunami:  What You Need to Know to Help Your Clients” at Avalara’s CRUSH DC 2018 in Washington, DC.

May 21-22, 2018: Thomas Jones is presenting “Impact of the Change in Corporate Tax Rates & Other Tax Developments” at the Texas Captive Insurance Association 5th Annual Conference in Houston, TX.