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Justin Jesse focuses his practice on US and international tax and tax controversy. He advises clients on all aspects of tax disputes, including cases before the US Tax Court, US district courts and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Such matters have included disputes relating to captive insurance, research and development credits, transfer pricing and tax advantaged transactions. He has also represented clients before Congress relating to investigations of tax-related matters. Read Justin Jesse's full bio.

Today, taxing authorities across the globe, including the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), are increasing their efforts to gather and share sensitive taxpayer information, often aggressively seeking copies of tax advice, opinions and analysis prepared by counsel and other advisors. In some situations, tax advisors specifically draft their advice to be shared with third parties, but frequently the IRS seeks advice that was always intended to be confidential client communications—for example, drafts and emails containing unfinished analysis and unguarded commentary. Sharing this latter type of advice could be problematic for taxpayers because such advice could be used as a road map for examiners during an audit and may mislead the IRS regarding the strength or weakness of a taxpayer’s reporting positions.

Last month, we spoke to tax executives at Tax Executives Institute forums in Houston and Chicago about the IRS’s increased use of treaty requests to obtain US taxpayers’ documents and information from international tax authorities.
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As anticipated in our earlier post, Country-by-Country (CbC) reporting is finally here! On Wednesday, the US Department of the Treasury released final regulations for CbC reporting, effective June 30, 2016. The final regulations apply to any US person who is the “ultimate parent” of a multinational enterprise group that has annual revenue for

Country-by Country (CbC) reporting is on the horizon for large US multi-national enterprises (MNE).  As part of the broader Base Erosion Profit Shifting (BEPS) project undertaken by the Group of 20 (G20) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the United States will soon require the parent entity of large US MNE groups