Photo of Timothy S. Shuman

Timothy (Tim) S. Shuman focuses his practice on corporate and international tax matters for US and non-US multinationals, with particular emphasis on domestic and cross-border acquisitions, dispositions, restructurings and liquidations. He has extensive experience in structuring spin-offs and tax-free reorganizations involving publicly traded and privately held companies, and regularly represents clients in obtaining private letter rulings and other guidance from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). He also works on tax issues involving regulated investment companies. Read Tim Shuman's full bio.

Following the 2017 Tax Act, the US tax costs to a corporate US shareholder that sells stock in a controlled foreign corporation (CFC) are significantly reduced. Beginning in 2018, the amount of gain will be generally less than in prior years and most or all such gain will frequently not be subject to any US federal income taxation.

The amount of gain recognized in a sale of course is the difference between the amount realized and the selling shareholder’s adjusted tax basis in the stock of the CFC. The initial basis in the stock of a CFC is increased by the amount of earnings of the CFC and its subsidiaries that was included in the gross income of the domestic corporation under Subpart F (i.e., previously taxed earnings). The increase in basis can be significant as a result of the transition tax Subpart F inclusion of post-1986 earnings of CFCs and the expansion of Subpart F inclusions for global intangible low-taxed income (GILTI).

The gain recognized by a domestic corporation upon the sale of stock in a CFC generally is capital gain subject to a 21 percent tax rate. Section 1248, however, recharacterizes as a deemed dividend all or a portion of the gain. The amount of gain recharacterized generally equals the amount of non-previously taxed earnings of the CFC and its foreign subsidiaries. Provided the domestic corporate shareholder held the CFC stock for at least one year, the amount of the gain recharacterized as a dividend generally is eligible for a 100 percent dividends received deduction under section 245A.

Continue Reading Tax Reform Insight: US Tax Costs Significantly Reduced on Sale of CFC Stock

A House-Senate conference committee has reached agreement on a compromise version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which includes substantial changes to the corporate and international business taxation rules. The stage now appears to be set for final passage and enactment of the legislation before the end of 2017.

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The October 2017 issue of Focus on Tax Strategies & Developments has been published. This issue includes five articles that provide insight into US federal and international tax developments and trends across a range of industries, as well as strategies for navigating these complex issues.

Republican Leaders Release Tax Reform Framework
By David G. Noren Alexander Lee

M&A Tax Aspects of Republican Tax Reform Framework
By Alexander Lee, Alejandro Ruiz and Timothy S. Shuman

State and Local Tax Aspects of Republican Tax Reform Framework
By Peter L. Faber

Grecian Magnesite Mining v. Commissioner: Foreign Investor Not Subject to US Tax on Sale of Partnership Interest
Kristen E. Hazel, Sandra P. McGill and Susan O’Banion

The IRS Attacks Taxpayers’ Section 199 (Computer Software) Deductions
Kevin Spencer, Robin L. Greenhouse and Jean A. Pawlow


Read the full issue of Focus on Tax Strategies & Developments

On April 4, 2016, the Internal Revenue Service and the US Department of the Treasury issued proposed regulations pursuant to Internal Revenue Code (IRC) section 385 addressing whether an interest in a related corporation is treated as stock or indebtedness for US federal income tax purposes (Proposed Regulations). On June 29, 2016, both the DC Bar Taxation Section and the New York State Bar Association Tax Section submitted comments on the Proposed Regulations. Both Tax Sections urged Treasury not to finalize the Proposed Regulations. The DC Bar Taxation Section letter can be found here and the New York State Bar Association Tax Section letter can be found here.

The Proposed Regulations have been met with substantial criticism by the tax bar and taxpayers alike. The Proposed Regulations would have a significant impact on intercompany debt of multinational groups and could, if finalized in their proposed form, force major changes in the way that taxpayers conduct routine business.